Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

What are auxiliary aids and services?

Auxiliary aids and services are items, equipment or services that assist in effective communication between a person who has a hearing, vision or speech disability and a person who does not. There is a list of examples in the ADA, but the ADA was written in 1990. There are so many new technologies and services that have been invented and discovered since then, that the items listed in the ADA are not the only options available.

What are some examples of effective communication?

Effective communication can include:

  • Hospitals that provide televisions for use by patients and hotels, motels and places of lodging that provide televisions in five or more guest rooms must provide a closed caption decoder upon request.
  • Tax bills and other print communication by a state or local government must be made available to individuals with vision impairments in a form that is usable by them.
  • PowerPoint presentations at city council meetings must be described to someone who can not see.

Who is covered under the requirement for effective communication?

People who have communication disabilities – disabilities that affect hearing, vision, or speech — are covered.  A person with a communication disability has the right to enjoy equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from all programs, services, and activities, whether they are provided by a state or local government, or they are provided by a public accommodation.

If we have hand-outs at our seminar do they all have to be in Braille?

Material in an accessible format, such as Braille, is an example of an auxiliary aid that can be provided on an as-needed basis.  However, knowing your audience is key.

Promotional and registration materials for the seminar should include and explain how the public may request a particular auxiliary aid or service. This information should include contact information and a deadline for requesting individualized accommodations to ensure there is enough time to order or produce the Braille materials.

I am hosting an event at a hotel. Who is responsible for providing wheelchair access to the stage?

Both the hotel and the public entity or private business renting the hotel meeting space have responsibilities under the ADA to ensure that everyone regardless of disability has an equal opportunity to enjoy the services and facilities offered by your event.

If the hotel provides temporary stages or raised platforms, they must make these temporary elements accessible to people with disabilities unless doing so would result in an undue administrative or financial burden.

We are providing meals at our conference. An attendee said she has food allergies. Do we need to have a special meal prepared for her?

In order to be viewed as a disability under the ADA, an impairment must substantially limit one or more major life activities. An individual's major life activities of respiratory or neurological functioning may be substantially limited by allergies or sensitivity to a degree that he or she is a person with a disability.  For example this may include an individual with severe nut allergies, the symptoms of which may include difficulty swallowing and breathing.

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