auxiliary aids

Who chooses the auxiliary aid or service that will be provided?

The person making the request should be clear about his/her needs; the person providing the auxiliary aid or service needs to be sure that what is provided is also effective. 

If the request comes to a state or local government agency, the agency must give priority to the type of auxiliary aid or service the person identifies.  If the request comes to a Title III or private entity, however, the business can decide on the specific type of auxiliary aid it provides as long as the aid provided is equally effective in ensuring accurate communication. 

What are auxiliary aids and services?

Auxiliary aids and services are items, equipment or services that assist in effective communication between a person who has a hearing, vision or speech disability and a person who does not. There is a list of examples in the ADA, but the ADA was written in 1990. There are so many new technologies and services that have been invented and discovered since then, that the items listed in the ADA are not the only options available.

If we have hand-outs at our seminar do they all have to be in Braille?

Material in an accessible format, such as Braille, is an example of an auxiliary aid that can be provided on an as-needed basis.  However, knowing your audience is key.

Promotional and registration materials for the seminar should include and explain how the public may request a particular auxiliary aid or service. This information should include contact information and a deadline for requesting individualized accommodations to ensure there is enough time to order or produce the Braille materials.

If I am using my facility to host a job fair, must I provide a sign language interpreter?

  • When is an organization or business required to provide an interpreter?

Public entities and private businesses have responsibilities under the ADA to furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to ensure effective communication with individuals with disabilities. A qualified sign language interpreter is considered an auxiliary aid or service.

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